Wednesday , January 17, 2018

School House Rocks!

article-Goddard

The cost of day care now rivals the price tag for college tuition in some parts of the U.S., according to a recent Child Care Aware of America report. Day care expenses are overshadowing the amount a family spends on housing, food and transportation.

 

The eye-popping figures include $16,549, which is how much parents had to pay per year on average for infant day care in Massachusetts in 2013, according to the report. Or $12,280, which was the price tag for a year of day care for a 4-year-old in New York.

 

In fact, the average annual cost for infant day care was higher than a year’s tuition at a four-year public college in 30 states and the District of Columbia. For parents of two children, full time day care is the highest single household expense in the Northeast, Midwest and South.

 

And the trend of increasing cost and increasing importance is only escalating. As the report points out, “The economic recovery will greatly benefit the day care industry. As parents and guardians, particularly females, rejoin the workforce, demand for day care services will grow. Additionally, expected increases in disposable income will allow families to spend more on child care, including high-value services such as early education programs.”

 

Few people are more familiar with the impact of an early and high quality preschool education than Bill and Amy Strickland, owner-operators of two locations of The Goddard School. The pair, hailing from the Southeast themselves, opened their first private preschool in Fort Mill in 2009, and a second in Rock Hill in 2013. At present, there are 10 Goddard School franchises throughout the greater Charlotte region.

 

“Goddard Systems, Inc. is the franchisor,” explains Bill Strickland, “and the interesting thing is, the guy who started the company—Tony Martino—was the same one that started Maaco.”

 

Anthony A. Martino, a well known and celebrated guru in the franchising world, took companies from the ground up and made them national brands. He was the force behind the Aamco (an acronym of his initials) Transmissions enterprise which he started up and sold, and subsequently Maaco Enterprises which he built into a 450-franchise collision repair and auto painting retail network.

 

Along the way he developed a franchise of tune-up shops he sold to Meineke, and also the early development child care franchise called The Goddard School.

 

The Goddard School concept came about in 1988, when Martino was approached by a former associate with an idea for providing upscale child care with degreed teachers at every level, he thought it could and should be duplicated. Based on an educational philosophy that emphasizes nurturing the whole child, the Goddard School focuses on emotional, social, intellectual and physical development as well as standard educational goals for children six weeks to six years.

 

Today, the franchise has grown to over 400 child care centers with more than 50,000 students in 35 states. It has been ranked the No. 1 childcare franchise for the last 13 years by Entrepreneur magazine, and in the Top 200 Franchise Systems (worldwide sales) by Franchise Times for the eighth year.

 

The Goddard School Attraction

 

“The Goddard Schools rely on the franchise model of offering a nurturing environment, advocating genuine learning, and collaboration with parents to help children reach their fullest potential,” says Bill. You can walk into any Goddard School and feel the uncommon level of quality, value and education—consistently.

 

“We’re both owner-operators of the Rock Hill and Fort Mill schools. I think what makes us work so well together is that we have complementary skills. My background is more in technology and business and consulting, while Amy’s is in retail, education, human resources and sales. As a result, we perform alternate but complementary functions.”

 

The couple began their journey toward becoming Goddard School franchisees in an interesting way. When first married, the Stricklands moved around the country and the world, living in places such as Atlanta, Singapore, Washington, D.C., and Cleveland. Having three daughters with Amy as a stay-at-home mom, the couple was always finding new pediatricians, orthodontists, and other care providers when they moved…including preschools.

 

“When we moved to a suburb just outside of Cleveland, I did what I always did and asked around for preschool recommendations,” says Amy. “Where do you hear good things, where do people seem happy? And Goddard Schools kept coming up. So I visited—just as parents visit our schools to see if we are the right fit for their families—and I just fell in love with it.”

 

Because the couple’s daughter was attending a Goddard School at the time, and because all Goddard Schools require on-site ownership, Amy was able to get to know the owner of her daughter’s school, learning about the challenges and rewards of franchise ownership in the process.

 

At the same time, Bill was getting tired of getting on an airplane every week for his consulting work, and was receptive to a small business opportunity. Together, the Stricklands found the Goddard School concept so compelling, that they decided to try it themselves as a franchisee.

 

“Ohio wasn’t home for us,” comments Amy. “The Southeast is more our home; we have family down here. So, we scouted a lot of locations and decided on Fort Mill. We opened our first location in January of 2009, and then expanded to a second location in Rock Hill in January of 2013.”

 

Bill adds, “One of the reasons we decided on the Charlotte area is because my background is in financial services consulting, so the thinking was that I could keep doing that while she was setting up and running the school. I did continue doing that for a few years, but now with two schools, I’m plenty busy.”

 

“Charlotte offers so much in the way of infrastructure, and the Fort Mill and Rock Hill areas are growing like weeds,” he continues. “Also, the reputation of the public schools in Fort Mill and Rock Hill is tremendous, and the Carolinas are a very pro-business environment.”

 

“I would also add that, in the greater Charlotte area, you’re a day trip to the beach or a day trip to the Great Smokey Mountains, you can easily get down to Savannah or Charleston or Atlanta, and the whole region has such a rich history,“ says Amy. “Also, the international airport is perfect for when you want to fly to Europe or the Bahamas. Climate is a big one too…here, you get a little bit of everything.”

 

Brain-based Learning

 

“My primary focus is sales and marketing—to keep the schools full, to reach out to the community, and to set the culture for the school,” explains Amy. “I also do classroom observations. I’m heavily involved with recruiting and screening new teacher candidates, and I handle many of your typical HR issues. Bill’s approach is a little bit different.”

 

“My goal is to get the message out and craft the brand,” contributes Bill, “to keep reinforcing the message of education, to keep setting a higher standard for what we’re all about. I would say each school has a mission, and I’m very proud that ours is all about educational excellence—about preparing each and every child for kindergarten while becoming become independent, enthusiastic learners. In fact, lifelong learners.”

 

Amy explains, “Goddard’s educational philosophy is brain-based, which is learn through play. The way that I share that with families is, let’s say you’re working on letter formation. You could give a child a pencil and a piece of paper and have him or her practice writing the letter 25 times, which is not very fun.

 

“A more fun approach would be to take a cookie sheet and pour on a couple tablespoons of kosher salt and then have the child draw the letter in the salt with a finger. The, you shake it up or turn it and have the child repeat the exercise. You’re reinforcing the same skill, but one feels like fun and one feels like work. Play with purpose is one way I like to frame things.”

 

The word “preschool” means a lot of things to different people as it is often used interchangeably with “child development center” and “daycare.” The Strickland’s approach through their Goddard Schools, however, is different. The Goddard School educates children as young as seven or eight weeks old with the concept that learning begins at birth.

 

“Our ultimate goal for any of our learners is successful entry into any public or private kindergarten program,” explains Amy. “We use an overall approach in building skill sets, and that includes cognitive, social/emotional, gross motor skills, fine motor skills…those are all puzzle pieces that are necessary for a child to have a successful year in kindergarten.

 

“So, that doesn’t start at three years old…learning begins at birth. That’s why we write lesson plans in our infant classrooms. We’re trying to set up activities that foster the development of certain skills.”

 

Higher Standards for Higher Learning

 

“One of the main things that sets our schools apart,” Amy continues, “is the education level of our teachers. All of our teachers are degreed, something that isn’t common in many childcare centers. Early childhood education is all of the learning, both formal and informal, that takes place before kindergarten.

 

“Many people, including some universities with education programs, believe that early childhood education begins later in life at 3 years of age. We don’t agree with that, and there’s a lot of science behind the idea of having children engaged from birth. As a result, we also believe that having resources in the classroom—technological and traditional resources in the classroom—is very important.”

 

“Here, our teachers are working, teaching, educating each child, not just watching them,” adds Bill. “We set out at the beginning to say that we’re not going to be a daycare or a typical childcare center. We’re a preschool, and even at infant level, as Amy said, learning begins at birth.

 

“Research shows that if you don’t give kids a good start, they tend to fall behind sooner rather than later, and in some cases, they may never catch up. The later you wait, the harder it is for those kids to get back on track, and this can go on to affect their entire lives.”

 

Although Goddard Systems provides franchisees with a multitude of educational resources, Bill and Amy have found that, because many of their students were coming from homes where learning was already a part of everyday life, they needed to raise the bar. In fact, some of the local schools are taking note as graduates of Goddard Schools often crave even more education and are surpassing their peers upon entering the public school system.

 

“One of our philosophies is to adhere to continuous improvement. We set the bar in one place, surpass it, and then move it again,” explains Bill. “We also revamped our educational processes to embrace 21st century skills, an initiative that looks to go beyond just reading, writing and arithmetic to additionally teach critical thinking skills, creativity, communication and collaboration.

 

“An organization that supports 21st Century Learning (Washington, D.C.-based P21.org) visited our schools in 2012 and recognized our schools as being Exemplar in 21st Century Skills learning, one of 20 in the United States.”

 

Bill continues, “Today, businesses are saying to the educational community, ‘We need people who can think, not just memorize.’ When you look at it, all the information you need is available at your fingertips on the Internet these days. But, now that you have information, can you solve problems with it?

 

“We’ve changed how we teach, and then we started taking it up another notch and rolled out a S.T.E.M. program that focuses on science, technology, engineering and math. We have kids building robots, kids as young as three doing computer programming.”

 

Additionally, the Strickland’s Goddard Schools use iPads, interactive whiteboards, and other technology in the classroom in order to prepare students for the digital landscape that is unfolding before them.

 

“This is where Bill and I bump heads a little bit,” laughs Amy, “because I’m more old-school. I certainly recognize the value of technology, but as we often say, ‘Parents are teachers too.’ We encourage our parents to unplug from the technology for a while.

 

“While you’re walking the dog with your child, encourage them to find a license plate from another state or one with a certain letter or number. Identify living and non-living things. Challenge your child to find things that come in pairs in the bedroom when tucking him or her in at night. So, yes, technology is important, but so is person-to-person interaction.”

 

Bills adds with a smile, “And that’s one of the strengths that Amy and I have—we push each other and challenge each other, but that’s how innovation and achievement come about. Study the problem and negotiate. And that is one of the many reasons we’re successful.

 

“Our mission is educational excellence, and through our two Goddard Schools, we’re proud to combine our skills to complete the mission.”

 

Company Name: The Goddard School, Rock Hill and Fort Mill
Address: 415 Clouds Way Rock Hill, S.C. 29715
Phone: 803-328-2112
Website Address: www.goddardschool.com

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