Friday , August 18, 2017

The Global Employer – Strategies and Best Practices for an International Workforce

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The Global Employer – Strategies and Best Practices for an International Workforce

Contributed By: Hannah Little

Company: Garfinkel Immigration Law Firm

The Global Employer

Strategies and Best Practices for an International Workforce

16-10-21-garfinkel_global-employees-cultureDeveloping and retaining an international workforce is essential to be competitive in the global marketplace. With this in mind, employers are too often unpleasantly surprised by visa and compliance issues. The global employer should ensure its workforce is mobile and comprised of the best and the brightest by strategizing to proactively address its immigration needs.

Hire smart. Implement a company-wide policy which asks key questions regarding immigration status of each and every candidate. Employers should confirm that each candidate is legally authorized to work and confirm whether the candidate will ever require sponsorship for an immigration-related benefit. The inquiry doesn’t end there. If a candidate indicates that he or she requires visa sponsorship, the global employer should probe further and ask additional questions about current status, length of time in current status, and whether a green card process has ever been initiated.

When recruiting talented candidates who are outside the U.S. and do not possess a work visa, the H-1B visa for professionals should be considered as a last resort due to the limited number available each fiscal year and the extremely high demand. With limited visa options, the global employer should focus its international recruitment efforts on employees who have served the organization internally for at least one year and may qualify for an intracompany transferee work visa. Further inquiry may be on outstanding individuals who may qualify pursuant to the O-1 exceptional/extraordinary visa. The global employer also should be aware that certain nationalities have additional visa options available to them, including but not limited to Australia, Canada, Mexico, Chile, and Singapore. Finally, if the global employer is a foreign-owned company or engages in substantial trade with another country, there may be additional visa options for employees who are citizens of that country (E visas).

Understand the possibilities and limitations of “Visitor” status. An individual who enters on a B-1 visitor visa or pursuant to the Visa Waiver Program (also commonly referred to as “ESTA”) is not authorized to work in the United States. The business visitor may attend meetings, conferences, and seminars, negotiate contracts and disputes, observe activities at a related company, or conduct business on behalf of an overseas employer. The business visitor may not receive wages from an U.S. entity. If a business visitor is traveling to the U.S. frequently or for extended periods of time, a work visa is recommended since this travel pattern typically raises a red flag for immigration officers at the port of entry. This could result in additional scrutiny, denial at the port of entry, or, in the worst case scenario, an expedited removal. If a key employee will be needed in the U.S. for any purpose other than a brief visit to attend meetings or other permissible activities, then it is advisable to contact your immigration law advisor before the trip to determine appropriate visa options.

Note that the law does allow for limited circumstances where someone in visitor status may work in the U.S. The most commonly utilized provision is for skilled technicians who enter the U.S. for the purpose of installing or repairing machinery sold by their employer within the last year, where the contract for sale provides for such service.

Plan for the future. Employers should aim to identify key employees who require H-1B sponsorship by November to ensure timely filing of cap-subject petitions. For employees who have already secured the H-1B visa or another type of work visa, the employer should bear in mind that work visas are temporary in nature and some cannot be extended beyond a certain time period. Global employers should ensure they are aware of these deadlines and identify employees they wish to sponsor for permanent resident status as soon as possible.

Be creative—global employers have the opportunity to create visa options. Global employers may send key employees to work for an affiliate, subsidiary, or parent company outside the U.S. for one (1) year in a specialized knowledge, managerial, or executive role. This strategy may qualify the employee for an L-1 visa and facilitate the green card process for those who qualify as Multinational Managers.

Be prepared—act as if Big Brother is watching. Any number of government agencies may appear for a site visit. This includes U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) and its Fraud Detection and National Security (“FDNS”) division, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) and the Department of Labor (“DOL”). The smart employer conducts regular internal “audits” of all H-1B and L-1 workers to ensure that their job duties, work sites, and salary are consistent with the petition filed with USCIS. The audit should include a review of the Public Access File for each H-1B worker.

Furthermore, the global employer should schedule regular internal audits of its I-9 records to ensure they have been filled out properly and are up to date. Prepare for site visits by USCIS, ICE, and the DOL by designating someone from Human Resources (and at least one other individual at the company) who could be prepared to meet with an investigator should an unannounced visit occur. In addition to Human Resources, it is also advisable to notify corporate counsel and obtain the name a specific contact in the event of a visit from a government agency.

Fire smart. The global employer should know it bears additional obligations to the employee upon termination if the employee holds H-1B, O, or P status. The employer must reimburse the employee for the cost of return transportation to the home country and should notify USCIS of the termination. Finally, after an employee’s departure, the employer should ensure it complies with document retention requirements for I-9 records, Public Access Files, and PERM Audit files and implement a system to purge these records after the requisite time period has lapsed.

Stay Tuned. Government agencies have been working hard to implement regulations pursuant to President Obama’s 2014 executive actions. These regulations potentially offer several benefits to businesses including more flexibility for high-skilled workers, the modernization of the PERM process, and parole for entrepreneurs. Furthermore, the results of the November presidential election may result in significant immigration law changes.

Content contributed by Hannah F. Little, J.D., a N.C. Board Certified Immigration Law Specialist and partner in the Garfinkel Immigration Law Firm, representing employers and employees in a variety of industries and overseeing the firm’s family-based immigration matters. For more information, contact her at 704-926-9631 or hannah.little@garfinkelimmigration.com or visit www.garfinkelimmigration.com.

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Company Name: Garfinkel Immigration Law Firm

Phone: 704-926-9631

Website Address: www.garfinkelimmigration.com.

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